What's Up?

Planning ahead for events later this month? Check out the October program page. I've listed some of this weekend's events below, but there's plenty more between now and the end of the month. And if you're trying to gauge the best time and place for leaf peeping in PA, DCNR's fall foliage reports will help you work it out.

Governors at Pennsbury Manor
L to R: Pennsbury Society president Ron Schmid, Gov. Tom Ridge, Gov. Tom Corbett, Gov. Tom Wolf, Gov. Mark Schweiker, PHMC Chair Nancy Moses, Pennsbury Manor site administrator Doug Miller (via Facebook)
I'm a little late on the follow-up, but two weeks ago Pennsbury Manor hosted a luncheon and panel discussion in honor of the 300th anniversary of William Penn's death. The event was the culmination of Pennsbury's exploration of Penn's legacy during this anniversary year. Gov. Tom Wolf kicked off the luncheon with remarks on Penn's impact. Former governors Tom Corbett, Ed Rendell, Mark Schweiker, and Tom Ridge reflected on their terms in office and the responsibilities of following in Penn's footsteps (former Gov. Dick Thornburgh sent written remarks). It was, by all accounts, an impressive gathering and an excellent example of mixing history and contemporary issues (Bucks County Courier Times online article includes video).

The Pennsylvania Military Museum was recently featured in a post on the Getaway Mavens blog, which compiles "entertaining and eclectic" ideas for weekend trips in the northeastern US, with an emphasis on unique destinations. Their take on the greater State College area noted that the museum is small but "engaging and well-designed" and that walking the grounds is a great way to get some fresh air and "pay your respects to our lost soldiers."

Main mast of schooner Lettie G. Howard
On board the Lettie G. Howard, September 2018 (photo AKF)
The Lettie G. Howard, which spent this summer and early fall providing day sails out of the Erie Maritime Museum, recently went through the Welland Canal en route to a maintenance stop in Maine. The Flagship Niagara League posted video on their Facebook page showing a time lapse view of the Canal locks. The Lettie, which is in Erie under a collaborative program agreement with the South Street Seaport Museum in NYC, will then sail down the east coast of the US to Florida for the winter. Come spring the schooner will return to Erie for another summer of sailing. This arrangement has meant that visitors to the museum get to see a tall sailing ship even when U.S. Brig Niagara is away touring the Great Lakes. Visit the website for more info on the east coast trip and opportunities to participate.

On Wednesday, Oct. 17, the PHMC and the PA Dept. of General Services will host a meeting to update the public on plans for the new Pennsylvania State Archives building, currently in design. The new building will be located on a 3-acre lot bounded by Sixth, Seventh, Harris, and Hamilton Streets in Harrisburg. Staff from the two state agencies responsible for the project will provide a progress report, answer questions, and listen to community feedback. The event will begin at 5:30 pm and will be hosted by Camp Curtin YMCA, 2135 N. 6th St., Harrisburg.

This weekend...

Genevieve Pallas shows Shelby Vaccaro how to make a broom
LVM broom maker Genevieve Pallas shows Shelby Vaccaro from Lancaster Newspapers how it's done (via Facebook)

Hope Lodge
October 14: Site open—Hope Lodge will be open from 1 pm to 4 pm, with guided tours at 1:00 and 2:30 pm. Admission charged.

Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum
Oct. 13-14: Harvest Days—a classic special event and a great way to celebrate the heart of the fall season. Loads of demonstrations and activities for the whole family in a beautiful setting. Admission: adults, $12; seniors, $10; age 6-11, $8; free for members and children age 5 and younger. Free parking and food available for purchase. Skip the admissions lines by purchasing your tickets through Brown Paper Tickets (please note that the event is rain or shine and there are no refunds for online tickets). 11 am-5 pm.

Old Economy Village
Oct. 13: Multiple activities—there will be a Gardening Class, Beer Tasting, and a Sip and Paint evening. Times and fees vary; please click on individual activities for details.

Pennsbury Manor
Oct. 14: Living History Theater—William Penn’s steward and housekeeper, John Sotcher and Mary Lofty, will be united in marriage according to 17th-century Quaker wedding customs. Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.

PA Trails of History Events, Oct. 5-18

Most sites on the PA Trails of History will be closed on Oct. 8 for Columbus Day. The Railroad Museum of PA will be open (see info below).

If you're planning ahead, the full October program page is also available.

Also, please note that some site schedules change seasonally, mostly affecting which days of the week the site is open. Be sure to check ahead before visiting. And speaking of seasonal changes (smooth, huh?), check out this week's update of the fall foliage map for Pennsylvania and plan your leaf peeping.

Apple dumpling from Ephrata Cloister
Yum. See info below to find out how to buy one (or more) of these and support the Ephrata Cloister.

Anthracite Heritage Museum and Scranton Iron Furnaces
Oct. 11: Celebrating Our Anthracite Heritage—this free program honors Anthracite Heritage Month. Jamie Longazel will present "Undocumented Fears: Immigration and the Politics of Divide and Conquer", and Stephanie Longo's topic will be "Italians in NEPA" (more info on the Facebook event page). 7-9 pm.

Bushy Run Battlefield
Oct. 17: History Speaks Series—“Celtic Ceol…A Musical Journey,” is an acoustical program of traditional 17th- and 18th-century Irish, Scottish, French, and English music. Brenda Walker, Tom Lighthall, Nancy Podey, and Larry Podey will play an assortment of intstruments, including Irish whistle, guitar, fiddle, hammered dulcimer, banjo, and bodhran. Some of the music will be interwoven with the ancient stories they represent to bring the past to life. Cost is $8 in advance, $10 at the door (members receive 10% discount). Contact secretary@bushyrunbattlefield.com or Bushy Run Battlefield at 724-527-5584 for tickets. 7 pm.

Conrad Weiser Homestead
UPDATE: Oct. 6-7: Site open—the Homestead will be open for visitors on Saturday from 9 am to 4 pm and on Sunday from noon to 4 pm. Guided tours will be available on Sunday.

Cornwall Iron Furnace
Oct. 9: Friends Lecture Series— Jim Polczynski will present "The Impact of Divorce in the James Coleman Family." Lectures take place in the auditorium of Freeman Community Center at Cornwall Manor Retirement Community. Program is free; donations are welcome. 7 pm.

Ephrata Cloister
Oct. 5-6: Apple Dumpling Sales—enjoy a delicious PA Dutch tradition and support the Back to the Cloister Fund (which has helped to return more than 100 original furnishings and objects to the site). Dumplings, from Aschenbach's Achenbach's Bakery [and thanks to an eagle-eyed colleague for the correction], are $4 each (this year, apple pies and pumpkin pies will also be available). There is no admission charge to buy apple dumplings (regular admission applies if you want to tour the site). Pre-orders for 5 or more dumplings will be accepted, and free local delivery can be arranged for advance orders of 20 or more; call 717/733-6600. Fri., 9:30 am-4 pm; Sat., 9:30 am until sold out.
Oct. 7: Day of Music—the Ephrata Cloister Chorus will perform in the Saal at 2, 3, and 4 pm. The program will include music composed at the historic community in the 1700s, along with works from other early American communities. The volunteer group is currently rehearsing a new transcription of a hymn written at Ephrata in the 1740s. While all ninety-two verses (!) of this important composition are not planned, there may be a sampling of a few portions. Included in regular admission. Site is open noon-5 pm (guided tours will be available).
Oct. 12: Community Days School Program—students and teachers move at their own pace among learning stations located throughout the site. Advance reservations are strongly encouraged; call 717/733-6600. Cost is $7 per student, with one adult admitted free for every 10 paying students (additional adults pay $9 each). 9:30 am-1 pm.

Fort Pitt Museum
Please visit the Fort Pitt Museum website for info on holiday schedules, events, and programs.

Graeme Park
Oct. 10: Lunch and Learn—Hugh Boyle, president and executive director of the Grand Army of the Republic Civil War Museum and Library, will present "Duel at Dawn - The Feud Between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr." Cost is $30 per person ($25 for members) and includes continental breakfast and lunch buffet. Reservations are required; registration form is on the website. 10:30 am-1:30 pm.
Oct. 18: Happy Hour with the Historian—this evening's topic is "The 'Body Snatchers' of the 18th Century," and the program will take place in the Graeme Park Cemetery (or indoors if the weather doesn't cooperate). Cost is $5 per person (free for members). Food and drink available for purchase starting at 6 pm, program begins at 7.

Hope Lodge
October 7 & 14: Site open—Hope Lodge will be open from 1 pm to 4 pm, with guided tours at 1:00 and 2:30 pm. Admission charged.

Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum
Fall Workshops continue this month. Visit Landis Valley's workshops page for details and registration.
Oct. 13-14: Harvest Days—a classic special event and a great way to celebrate the heart of the fall season. Loads of demonstrations and activities for the whole family in a beautiful setting. Admission: adults, $12; seniors, $10; age 6-11, $8; free for members and children age 5 and younger. Free parking and food available for purchase. Skip the admissions lines by purchasing your tickets through Brown Paper Tickets. 11 am-5 pm.
Oct. 18: Hands-On History Days—children of all ages get to experience seasonal chores, hands-on crafts, wagon rides, and more. Reservations are not required but you can purchase tickets online in advance if you like (program details). Admission: $11 per person (members and children age 5 and younger get in free). 9 am-3 pm.

Old Economy Village
Oct. 6-7: Erntedankfest - A Harvest Festival—celebrate the fall harvest as artisans throughout the village cook, bake, and demonstrate their craft skills. Music, food, and family activities make this a great tradition. Included in regular admission. Sat., 10 am-5 pm; Sun., noon-5 pm.
Oct. 13: Multiple activities—there will be a Gardening Class, Beer Tasting, and a Sip and Paint evening. Please see calendar of events for details.

Pennsbury Manor
Sundays in October: Special programming—Oct. 7, Historic Trades (the blacksmith, joyners, and spinners will demonstrate their skills); Oct. 14, Living History Theater (William Penn’s steward and housekeeper, John Sotcher and Mary Lofty, will be united in marriage according to 17th-century Quaker wedding customs). Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.

Pennsylvania Lumber Museum
Oct 6-7: Annual Fall Antique and Collectible Show—this event features dozens of vendors and supports the programs of the Lumber Museum. Other activities include sawmill operation (Saturday only), birch still and blacksmithing demos, and food for purchase in the community room. $5 admission ($3 for kids) includes the show and all museum exhibits and activities. 10 am-5 pm.

Pennsylvania Military Museum
Oct. 2: Central PA Civil War Roundtable Series—Chuck Teague will present "The Shadow of Napoleon on Lee at Gettysburg." Donation requested. 7-8 pm.
Oct. 7: Friends' Lecture Series—speaker is John Crider, presenting "The Cold War Up Close in the 1980s." Donation requested. 2-3 pm.

Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Oct. 7: Garden Railways Tour—this event features outdoor model train layouts at private residences and retirement communities around Lancaster County. Tickets ($10 per person for ages 6 and up) may be purchased at the museum or at any Stauffer’s of Kissel Hill store in central Pennsylvania. The program flyer has more info; a list and map of participating locations will be provided with your ticket. 1-5 pm.
Oct. 8: Columbus Day—the museum is OPEN today. 9 am-5 pm.
Oct. 18: Wine and Paint Night—you bring the beverage (alcoholic or non), the museum supplies non-breakable glassware, light snacks, and the painting supplies. An instructor from the Zolē Art Factory in Strasburg will walk you through the steps to create a seasonal painting. More info, including an Eventbrite link for tickets, is on the museum website. Cost is $37 per person (plus a small ticketing fee); you must be at least 21 to attend. 6:30-8:30 pm.

State Museum of Pennsylvania
Check the Planetarium webpage for a full schedule of programs.
Oct. 1-5: Archaeology at Fort Hunterthis season's excavations by the State Museum archaeology team wrap up this week. You can drop by between 9:30 am and 4:30 pm to see what's up.
Oct. 5: StoryTime—this month's program, designed for kids age 3-5 with an adult, starts with reading A Little of Lady Who Wasn’t Afraid of Anything, written by Linda D. Williams and illustrated by Megan Lloyd. Then it's off to the Planetarium for an adaptation of Linda White's Too Many Pumpkins, also illustrated by Megan Lloyd. Included in general admission. 10-11 am.
Oct. 11: Nature Lab—"Creatures of the Night" explores bats, raccoons, and skunks as examples of nocturnal animals. Geared for general audiences, age 7 and older. Included in general admission. 11:30 am-12:30 pm.
Oct. 17: National Fossil Day—learn about "Giants of the Late Cretaceous" in the Paleontology Gallery. Included in general admission. 12:15 pm.

Washington Crossing Historic Park
Please visit the Washington Crossing Historic Park calendar of events for details of this month's events and programs.

Ask an Archivist and A Look Back at September

The October program page is now available. Events and programs coming up this weekend (where did September go?) are listed below. Also, please note that as we move further into autumn, some site schedules change seasonally, mostly affecting which days of the week the site is open. Please be sure to check ahead before visiting.

Ask an Archivist 2018

On Wednesday, October 3, join four archivists from the Pennsylvania State Archives as they test their knowledge on Twitter. Kurt Bell, Rich Saylor, Aaron McWilliams and Tyler Stump will take part in Ask an Archivist Day. Sponsored by the Society of American Archivists, Ask An Archivist offers the public the opportunity to connect directly to archivists in their community. Archivists around the country will respond to questions tweeted with the hashtag #AskAnArchivist. Questions will vary widely, from the silly (What do archivists talk about over lunch?) to the practical (How do I preserve records that were damaged in a flood?) Ask an Archivist Day is open to everyone - all you need is a Twitter account. To participate, just tweet a question to @PHMC and include the hashtag #AskAnArchivist in your tweet. Our archivists will see your question instantly. Here’s our schedule:
  • 10-11 am: Richard Saylor will share his research into the unusual records he's discovered within the collections of the State Archives
  • 11 am-noon: Kurt Bell will focus on Pennsylvania's railroad history, especially the records held by the Pennsylvania State Archives and the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
  • 1:30-2:30 pm: Aaron McWilliams will answer your questions regarding genealogy and family histories. Ask Aaron about the celebrities, such as Katey Sagal and Steve Buscemi, who have visited the Archives
  • 2:30-3:30 pm: Tyler Stump will share his knowledge regarding the Pennsylvania State Archives' institutional records, particularly those from mental institutions and prisons

Looking Back at September

Battle of Lake Erie memorial event at Erie Maritime Museum
Battle of Lake Erie commemoration with U.S. Brig Niagara (left) and schooner Lettie G. Howard (right) in background (photo Linda Bolla)
On September 10, Erie Maritime Museum and U.S. Brig Niagara hosted their annual commemoration ceremony for the Battle of Lake Erie in 1813. The battle, a pivotal event of the War of 1812 that took place off of Put-in-Bay, Ohio, is interpreted through the museum's exhibits and through tours and sailing experiences on board Niagara.

Floral wreath dropped into the water to honor Battle of Lake Erie
The annual Battle of Lake Erie commemoration includes a wreath placed into the water, this year off the Museum plaza (photo Linda Bolla)
Cornwall Iron Furnace offered cast iron cooking demonstrations on Sept. 22, with several members of their Friends group showing their skills. Cast iron was one of the primary products of the furnace, along with bar iron used by forges in the area. Find more photos on Cornwall's Facebook page.

Food cooked in cast iron pots at Cornwall Iron Furnace
Part of the cast iron cooking demonstration at Cornwall earlier this month (via Facebook)
Hungry yet? How about this recent photo of the bake oven at Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum?

Goods from the bake oven at Landis Valley Museum
See more yummy food and other seasonal products at Landis Valley's Harvest Days event, Oct. 13-14 (via Facebook)

And while we're on the subject of food (I consider wine one of the essential food groups), Old Economy Village just reopened the historic wine cellar on the property after a restoration project (more photos on Facebook). You can check it out for yourself at Erntedankfest: A Harvest Festival, Oct. 6-7.

Wine cellar at Old Economy Village
Friends of Old Economy Village enjoy a members-only preview of the restored wine cellar beneath the Mechanics Building (via Facebook)

This weekend...

Anthracite Heritage Museum
Sept. 28: Fundraiser—Cooper's Seafood House in Scranton hosts a charity night on the last Friday of every month, and this month Anthracite Heritage Museum gets 100% of the proceeds. Details on the restaurant's website. 5-8 pm.

Bushy Run Battlefield
Sept. 29: Fall Nature Walk—Bushy Run volunteers and nature enthusiasts will lead a tour to help you learn about the local flora and fauna on the grounds. Cost is $5 (free for members). 10 am.

Daniel Boone Homestead
Sept. 29: Heritage Day—all kinds of activities will take place throughout the site. Cooking, baking, dancing, magic, and much more (details on the calendar of events.) Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.

Drake Well Museum and Park
Sept. 29: Something More Saturday—family-friendly craft activities are included in regular admission today (check the Facebook event page for more info). Blacksmithing demos will also be offered. 10 am-3 pm.

Graeme Park
Sept. 28: Homeschool Day—activities include tours of the Keith House, open-hearth cooking, colonial games, and typical chores (program info). Cost is $6 per person; students must be accompanied by a responsible adult. 10 am-2 pm.

Pennsbury Manor
Sept. 29: PA Governor's Panel and Luncheon—PLEASE NOTE that Pennsbury will be closed to visitors 9/29 to allow for this event: current governor Tom Wolf and several former Pennsylvania governors will discuss the challenges of leading the commonwealth established by William Penn. A 3-course lunch will be served. A portion of the proceeds from this event will go toward establishing the "William Penn Scholarship Fund" for Title I schools. Tickets may be purchased online through TicketLeap. More information on the program, group tickets, and sponsorships is available on the Pennsbury website. 1-4 pm.
Sept. 30: Meet the Animals—visit with some of the animals that make Pennsbury their home. Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.

Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Sept. 29: Members Day—a full slate of activities and speakers is planned for Friends of the Railroad Museum (and it's not too late to join). Full info on the website.

State Museum of Pennsylvania
Please check the Planetarium page for program schedule.
Sept. 28 & 30: Mammal Hall activities—today (9/28), there's Curiosity Kids: Walk Like the Animals! and Make Your Own Paper Diorama at 11:30 am. On Sunday (9/30), celebrate the rededication of Mammal Hall, marking its 50th anniversary, with activities starting at 12:30 pm. General admission is $5 per person today through Sunday.

Invention of the Jeep

A listing of Trails of History events scheduled for today through the end of the month is available for your perusal. Thanks to PHMC's social media manager, Sean Adkins, for today's post.

A 1941 Bantam Reconnaissance Car, bearing serial number 1808, is in the collection of the PHMC's Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg, Centre County.

Today, we honor the Invention of the Jeep. This iconic vehicle traces its roots to Butler County, Pennsylvania. On Sept. 21, 1940, the American Bantam Car Co. delivered to the U.S. Army a prototype for the World War II-era jeep. One of only a handful of Bantams that survive is exhibited at the Pennsylvania Military Museum.

The following article originally appeared in the Summer 2003 issue of Pennsylvania Heritage.

A state historical marker erected by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) serves to remind the world that Butler, located in western Pennsylvania, about thirty-five miles north of Pittsburgh, is the birthplace of the vehicle now universally known as the jeep, built by the American Bantam Car Company. The factory, formerly the American Austin Car Company, which had produced more than twenty thousand vehicles, was acquired by the American Bantam Car Company in 1936. Within two years, the company was manufacturing Bantam cars and trucks.


PHMC dedicated this historical marker, "Invention of the Jeep," on October 17, 1993. The marker is located along Hansen Avenue in Butler County. 

On June 27, 1940, the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps released specifications and asked for proposals to develop a new four-wheel drive light military vehicle. The deadline for submitting a proposal was July 22! Bantam scrambled to find someone who could help the company submit a design. Finally, company officials convinced Karl K. Probst (about 1882-1963), a Detroit engineer, to undertake the challenge. Bantam's leaders imposed one condition: they could not pay Probst unless the company won the contract. Despite initial reluctance, Probst went to work on July 17, 1940, and in just two days laid out plans for the Bantam prototype. Bantam submitted its bid, complete with blue­prints, on July 22. The first Bantam prototype - cobbled together from bits and pieces of other vehicles - was completed and driven to Camp Holabird in Dundalk, near Baltimore, Maryland, on Sep­tember 21, meeting the forty-nine-day deadline - with thir­ty minutes to spare!

The Quartermaster Corps subjected the prototype to rigorous off-road trials, concluding, "this vehicle demonstrated ample power and all requirements of the service." The Ford Motor Company and the Willys Overland Company soon submitted their own prototypes, based on the Bantam designs, which had been shared with them by the Army. Ultimately, the Army ordered fifteen hundred units from each of the three manufacturers. Ford began delivering vehicles in April 1941, followed a few weeks later by Bantam and Willys. However, in light of Bantam's tenuous manufacturing capabilities and precarious financial condition, and the strength of its competitors, Ford and Willys were eventually granted contracts for mass produc­tion of the jeep. In the end, Bantam manufactured less than twenty-seven hundred Bantam Reconnaissance Cars (BRC-40s), and spent the World War II years building heavy duty trailers for the Army. The company closed in 1956.

The state historical marker, dedicated in 1993, stands at the company's former factory building on Hansen Avenue in Butler. A 1941 Bantam Reconnaissance Car, bearing serial number 1808, is in the collection of the PHMC's Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg, Centre County. It is one of only a handful of surviving Bantams. Auto­mobile enthusiast Leeland Bortmas, of Butler, restored and donated the jeep to the museum in 1994. Bortmas served in the 28th Infantry Division for four years. The 28th infantry Division Shrine and the 28th Division World War II Memorial are located on the grounds of the museum.

For more information: Pennsylvania Military Museum, 51 Boal Avenue, Boalsburg, PA. 16827; telephone (814) 466-6263; or visit the Pennsylvania Military Museum website.

Philadelphia and the 1918 Influenza Epidemic

With the impending weather (as I write this it's too soon to tell what will be happening in PA), please check ahead before heading out for Trails of History events this weekend. Stay safe.

Today's guest post comes from Christina M. Stetler, membership and annual giving coordinator for the Pennsylvania Heritage Foundation. Chris began researching the 1918 influenza pandemic while on staff at the Pennsylvania State Archives and was responsible for creating the Archives Research Guide on the subject. She also wrote a longer article, "The 1918 Spanish Influenza: Three Months of Horror in Philadelphia," which appears in the Autumn 2017 (Volume 84, No. 4) issue of Pennsylvania History, the journal of the Pennsylvania Historical Association. EDITOR'S NOTE/UPDATED INFO: The Fall 2018 issue of Pennsylvania Heritage includes "1918's Deadliest Killer: The Flu Pandemic Hits Pennsylvania," by Thomas J. McGuire.

For information on the 2018-19 flu season, including vaccination options, visit the influenza page on the PA Department of Health's website. This has been a public service announcement.


Soldiers Co K 110th Regt in ruins of French town Sept. 1918
Members of Co. K, 110th Regiment Infantry, passing through town captured by their comrades. Varennes-en-Argonne, Meuse, France. Sept. 26, 1918 (PA State Archives, MG-156 - Edward Martin Papers, 1866-1967)
In the fall of 1918, the war to end all wars raged in Europe. The United States, having joined the war in 1917, hoped their entrance would bring a swift conclusion to a battle-worn Europe. The war would end in November 1918, but not before death encircled the globe.

Medical professionals in the spring of 1918 recorded an unusual flu season. Doctors in Haskill, Kansas, noted an uptick in cases with symptoms unlike the typical flu season, though there were not an abnormal number of deaths. A doctor in Kansas mailed his notes to the Board of Health in Washington, D.C., which indicated he was concerned with what he saw. This act itself was uncommon, as influenza was not a mandatory reportable disease at the time.

Cases of influenza were few during the months of June, July, and early August. By the end of August, however, the influenza virus from the spring had returned, but more virulent and deadly.

The first indication of the coming calamity came from the Boston Naval Yard. In late August, men began going to the naval hospital complaining of illness. A few at a time, then a steady stream. So many coming in daily, that tents were set up to accommodate the ill. The war effort continued, however, and ships left the Boston Navy Yard for other American and European ports. One such vessel sailed to the Philadelphia Navy Yard, arriving on September 6. This ship carried the influenza virus into Philadelphia, leading to the deadliest outbreak of any U.S. city.

Once docked in Philadelphia, several sailors went immediately to the Naval Hospital complaining of flu symptoms. As in Boston, as the days went on, more sailors started developing symptoms and needing medical assistance. According to the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, on September 19, three sailors from the Navy Hospital passed away from the virus: James J. Keegan, Storekeeper 1st Class; Richard Singleton, Chief Boatswain’s Mate; and Mark J. Harrison, Fireman 1st Class. On the date of publication, there were 565 total cases of influenza at the Navy Yard and the 4th Naval District, with 136 cases presenting the previous day.

Death certificate for JJ Keegan victim of 1918 flu epidemic
James J. Keegan death certificate (Pennsylvania (State). Death certificates, 1906–1963. Series 11.90 (1,905 cartons). Records of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Record Group 11. PHMC/PA State Archives)

Cases of the virus spread to the rest of the city with civilian employees who worked at the Navy Yard. Though there were approximately 150 influenza cases outside the Navy Yard in mid-September, the Director of Public Health and Charities, Dr. William Krusen, believed the virus could be contained with normal precautions.

Shortly after the first deaths attributed to the outbreak were recorded, the Board of Health required influenza to be a reportable disease. Doctors were now required to report cases and isolate patients to try to curb the spread of the disease. Initially, this was to be only a temporary measure, but the requirement to report influenza cases continues to this day.

Liberty Loan Parade Philadelphia Sept 28 1918
Liberty Loan Parade at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 28 September 1918 (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command NH41730)
On September 28, 1918, Philadelphia put aside its concern with the influenza virus to support the Fourth Liberty Loan parade. In the previous three parades, Philadelphia had exceeded goals for support of the war effort and nothing would stop the city from kicking off the Fourth Liberty Loan drive.

This would be disastrous to the city and its citizens. Within days, the number of ill jumped to 635 new cases, with more being reported hourly. The city needed to take strong measures to curb the disease and on Thursday, October 3, the Philadelphia Board of Health closed all public schools and canceled all outdoor Liberty Loan meetings. [Editor's note: "Parade to Raise Money for World War I Brought Deadly Influenza to Williams Valley in 1918," on the Wynning History blog, explores a similar situation in a smaller Pennsylvania community.]

With the number of ill and dead mounting, the Board of Health also closed all saloons, theaters, and churches.

There's more to the story (read it here).

The week ahead (9/14-20)...

Bushy Run Battlefield
Sept. 19: History Speaks Series—Dana Knezevich, author of Life of Eastern Woodland Indians, will present “The Making of Native American Clothing” (program description is on the website). Cost is $8 in advance, $10 at the door (members get a 10% discount). Contact secretary@bushyrunbattlefield.com or Bushy Run Battlefield at 724-527-5584 for advance tickets.

Drake Well Museum and Park
Sept. 15: Fall Gas Up—the museum hosts the Pioneer Steam and Gas Engine Society's display of antique gas engines, oil field and farm equipment, and more. Included in regular admission. 9 am-3 pm.

Erie Maritime Museum and U.S. Brig Niagara
Sept. 20: Erie Yacht Club Happy Hour—the Lettie G. Howard will be at the Erie Yacht Club for a special dockside happy hour. The event is open to the public. Check the website for updated info.

Graeme Park
Sept. 16: Living History Sunday—today's event explores the struggle Pennsylvania’s Quaker families faced during the Civil War and the impact the war had on farms like Graeme Park. Admission charged. Noon-3 pm; presentation at 2 pm, tours of the Keith House available during the afternoon.
Sept. 20: Happy Hour with the Historian—Dr. Stephen Griffith will explore the history of theater production in colonial Philadelphia from the establishment of Pennsylvania in 1681 to 1800 (more details on the website). Cost to attend is $5 (free for members). Munchies and wine/beer available for purchase starting at 6 pm; lecture begins at 7.

Hope Lodge
Sept. 16: Site open—enjoy the grounds and take a guided tour of the mansion. Admission charged. 1-4 pm (tours at 1:00 and 2:30 pm).

Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum
Sept. 15: Wool Frolic and Yarn Sale—celebrate the fiber arts and the people, plants, and animals that make them possible. Enjoy activities for the kids and shop for deals on yarn, patterns, and paraphernalia. New this year - did you know that sheepdogs practice herding sheep by herding ducks? I didn't either, but now I do. You can give it a try. Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.

Old Economy Village
Sept. 15: Gardening class—"Next Year's Garden," presented by master gardener Cynthia Pagesh, will teach you how to help this year's garden become next year's garden through seed saving and cuttings (more info on Facebook event page). Call David Miller at (724)266-4500 ext.110 for details. 10 am-1 pm.

Pennsbury Manor
Sept. 16: Special programmingOpen Hearth Cooking features the bake oven today. Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.

Pennsylvania Lumber Museum
CORRECTION Sept. 15 22: "3rd" Weekend Program—"Voices of Pine Creek" is an oral history presentation (two documentaries) exploring life in the region through the experiences of local residents. Together the two films run about one hour and 20 minutes. Attendees will also get a sneak peek at the Webber Cabin, home to Bob and Dotty Webber for many years; Bob Webber is among the oral historians featured in "Voices of Pine Creek." 1 pm.

Pennsylvania Military Museum
Sept. 19: Civil War Lecture—William C. Davis, retired history professor and executive director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech, will present "Looking for Loreta--the Confederate Kardashian." Davis's talk, sponsored by the Civil War Era Center at Penn State, focuses on Loreta Velazquez, who allegedly disguised herself as a man to fight and and served as a Confederate spy during the Civil War. 7-8 pm.

State Museum of Pennsylvania
Please check the Planetarium page for program schedule.
Sept. 14: Learn at Lunchtime—author and photographer Tim Palmer will present "Twilight of the Hemlocks and Beeches," based on his book of the same title (more info). Included in general admission. 12:15 pm.
Sept. 16: Archaeology at Fort Hunter—Section of Archaeology staff and volunteers will be on hand for Fort Hunter Day to share their info with the public. This season's Fort Hunter excavations started Sept 5 and will continue on weekdays into October (see museum website for schedule details).

Catching Up

Please see last week's post for info on events coming up this weekend. If you're planning further ahead, the September program page has what you need.

Before I launch us into a selection of items that have come across my screen recently, I wanted to share some info related to the recent devastating fire at the National Museum of Brazil. Among the many responses coming from the spectrum that is the international museum community, the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums reposted a note from the Council of Museum Anthropology's Facebook page. If you (or someone you know) has ever visited the museum in Rio and took any photos (the irony here should not escape any of us), there is an initiative to create a visual archive of visitor photos. You can email photos to: thg.museo@gmail.com, lusantosmuseo@gmail.com, or isabelasfrreitas@gmail.com.

Looking Back at Labor Day

Lewis Hine photo of anthracite breaker boys, Library of Congress
"A View of Ewen Breaker..." in South Pittston, PA, circa 1911 (photo by Lewis W. Hine, in collection of Library of Congress, LC-DIG-nclc-01127)
An article in the Washington Post on Sept. 2 featured photographer Lewis Wickes Hine and the impact of his work on ending industrial child labor in the 20th century (read article online). Hine photographed work settings in various parts of the U.S., including the anthracite coal fields of Pennsylvania. Many of his photos can be found in the National Child Labor Committee collection at the Library of Congress. Learn more about breaker boys, coal miners, and mining communities by visiting the Anthracite Heritage Museum and Eckley Miners' Village on the PA Trails of History.

The Daily Antiquarian posted a history of Labor Day on their Facebook page and featured photos from several Trails of History sites, including Old Economy Village and Ephrata Cloister. It's a reminder that while some of our sites are focused on industrial labor (see industrial heritage trail), all of our sites interpret work in some form, be it domestic (see program at Conrad Weiser Homestead below), agricultural, or scientific, to name a few.

Pictures, pictures, pictures

The October 2018 issue of Early American Life has a beautiful photo of the Walter's Mill Covered Bridge at Somerset Historical Center by Ron Bruner (see it here on Facebook). This weekend (Sept. 7-9) you can see it in person and enjoy a vast array of craft demonstrations, entertainment, and regional foods at SHC's annual Mountain Craft Days festival (info here).

Old Economy Village plays a leading role in a new video from Beaver County Tourism that promotes the Ambridge Historic District (see below).

Staff of the Pennsylvania Military Museum hosted history classes from Penn State Altoona this summer, providing an insider's tour (literally) of a Sherman tank as well as hands-on experience with artifacts from the museum's collection (article from PSU Altoona website includes more details and photos of the visit).

Photographer Curt Weinhold, who works closely with the Pennsylvania Lumber Museum, posted a night sky image taken from the logging camp exhibit on the museum grounds. Potter County, where the museum is located, is known for its dark skies, and Curt is well-known for his night sky photography.



Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum
Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum

This year's "Ice Cream Sunday" event at Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum (Sept. 2) was expanded into a fine art and fine craft event (with ice cream) through a partnership with the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen. There are loads of beautiful photos on LVM's Facebook page and Jennifer MacNeill Photography shared a gorgeous bunch more. Enjoy (you'll have to supply your own ice cream)!

On the Trails of History, Sept. 1-13

Many PA Trails of History sites will be open on Monday, Sept. 3, for Labor Day (noted below). The full listing of September programs is available.

View from upper floor of Sisters House at Ephrata Cloister
View of the Saal (meetinghouse) from upper floor of the Sisters' House at Ephrata Cloister (photo AKF)
Anthracite Heritage Museum
Sept. 1: Museum Night at the Ballpark—watch the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders take on the Pawtucket Red Sox, remember The Office (maybe get a bobblehead), and help support the Anthracite Heritage Museum and Scranton Iron Furnaces. More info is on the museum website. Game time is 7:05 pm.
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Brandywine Battlefield
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.
Sept. 9: Afternoon Lecture Seriescheck the website for details.
Sept. 11: Remembrance Day—the annual ceremony commemorating the Battle of Brandywine, Sept. 11, 1777, and the events of Sept. 11, 2001, will be held. Event is free. 6-7 pm.

Bushy Run Battlefield
Sept. 8: General Meeting and Lecture—Serena Pape will present a program on West Overton Village, birthplace of Henry Clay Frick, exploring the history of the site as well as its current museum and other activities. Cost is $5 (free for members). 1 pm.

Conrad Weiser Homestead
UPDATE Sept. 1-2: Site open and Patriotic Concert—the site will be open Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm and Sunday from noon to 5 pm. Also on Sunday, the rescheduled Ringgold Band concert (free of charge) will take place at 5 pm.
Sept. 9: Living History Sunday—historical reenactors help bring the site and its history to life; today's theme is women's domestic activities. Guided tours offered. Noon-4 pm.

Cornwall Iron Furnace
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Drake Well Museum and Park
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Eckley Miners' Village
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Ephrata Cloister
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.
Sept. 6: Student Historians Informational Meeting—students aged 14 and up and their parents are invited to learn more about Ephrata Cloister's Student Historian program. This after-school club (meets Thursdays 3:30-5 pm) invites young people to gain community service experience while engaging in a variety of activities at the historic site. Register for the informational meeting by calling 717/733-6600.
Sept. 8: Ephrata Cloister Upstairs—a chance to view the upper floors of the 1743 Sisters' House, which are generally not open to visitors. Stairs are narrow and steep and may not be suitable for all visitors. Tickets are limited and advance registrations are encouraged; call the site at 717/733-6600. Cost per person is regular admission plus $15. 10 am-3 pm.
Sept. 10-11: Closed for maintenance—the site is schedule to be closed for maintenance on Monday, Sept. 10. Sept. 11 is the rain date for the maintenance project. If you plan to visit on the 11th, please call ahead (717/733-6600) to make sure they are open.

Erie Maritime Museum and U.S. Brig Niagara
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.
Sept. 10: Commemoration of the Battle of Lake Erie—to mark the 205th anniversary of the Battle of Lake Erie, a wreath laying ceremony and remarks will take place on the Outdoor Plaza of the Erie Maritime Museum. This year also is the 30th anniversary of the launch of the current incarnation of the U.S. Brig Niagara. Event is free and open to the public. 5:30 pm.

Fort Pitt Museum
Please check the Fort Pitt Museum website for information on programs and events this month.

Graeme Park
Sept. 5: Life in William Penn's Woods—take a guided walk of the grounds to learn about the plants and trees there now and in the Graemes' time. Leashed dogs are welcome. Cost is $2 per person. 6-7 pm.

Hope Lodge
Sept. 9: Site open—enjoy the grounds and take a guided tour of the mansion. Admission charged. 1-4 pm (tours at 1:00 and 2:30 pm). NOTE: site is closed for tours on Sun., Sept. 2.

Landis Valley Village and Farm Museum
September 2: Ice Cream Sunday—enjoy a "Celebration of Fine Art & Fine Craft" with the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen. The event is the culmination of a competition among artists and features judging of plein air artworks produced outdoors throughout the summer at the museum. Juried artists and craftspeople will also exhibit their pieces in the grove while lively music will play in the Firehouse. Free ice cream and wagon rides round out the event. (More details on the website.) Included in regular admission (free for members). Noon-5 pm.
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Old Economy Village
Sept. 13: Lecture—Jeffrey Snedden, freelance writer and historical researcher, will present a talk on life in Beaver County during World War I. Visitors will also have a chance to see OEV's exhibit on World War I. Free and open to the public. 7 pm.

Pennsbury Manor
Sept. 2 & 9: Special programming—Sept. 2, Historic Trades Day features joyners, blacksmiths, and spinners; Sept. 9, Living History Theater presents "New Colony, New Rules."Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Pennsylvania Lumber Museum
Sept. 1: Community Yard Sale—bargain hunters traveling Route 6 will find vendors in the parking lot of the museum on Saturday. Interested vendors may contact the museum at 814/435-2652 to reserve a spot ($10 donation). 10 am-4 pm.
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.

Pennsylvania Military Museum
Sept. 3: Labor Day—open regular hours, 10 am-5 pm. Guided tours at 11 am and 1 pm.
Sept. 8-9: Then & Now Living History Bivouac—explore a range of military uniforms and equipment from the 18th century to the present during this military timeline program. Battle dress uniform show and weapons demos at 1 pm each day. 10 am-4 pm. UPDATE 9/8: due to impending weather, the program is cancelled for 9/9.
Sept. 9: Friends' Lecture Series—Colonel Lewis Watt will present "Experiences of a Test Pilot." 2-3 pm.

Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Sept. 3: Labor Day—site open, check website for hours.
Sept. 8-9: Railroad Heritage Days—explore the rich history of railroading through presentations, model train layouts, art and photography, and more. Included in regular admission. Sat., 9 am-5 pm; Sun., noon-5 pm.

Somerset Historical Center
Sept. 7-9: Mountain Craft Days—since 1970, this event has brought together artisans and craftspeople of all types, and now includes children’s activities, cooking demonstrations, entertainment, and great food (visit SHC's Facebook page for previews of all kinds of activities). Admission is $9 for adults, $5 for kids 6-17 (Friday school tours are $3 per student). 10 am-5 pm.

State Museum of Pennsylvania
Please check the Planetarium page for program schedule.
Sept. 1-3: Archaeology at Kipona—staff from the museum's Section of Archaeology will be on Harrisburg's City Island to talk about excavations on the island. 10 am-6 pm each day.
Sept. 5-12: Mammal Hall closed—due to construction, Mammal Hall will be closed for a week. Later this month the museum will celebrate Mammal Hall's 50th birthday with a slew of activities (see calendar of events).
Sept. 5-25 (weekdays only): Archaeology at Fort Hunter—Section of Archaeology staff and volunteers will be at Fort Hunter (north of Harrisburg) for this season's excavations (more info on the website). The public is invited to stop by between 9:30 am and 4:30 pm on weekdays.
Sept. 7: StoryTime—this month's focus is spiders! Gather in Ecology Hall to read Walter's Wonderful Web by Tim Hopgood, play a fun spider web game, and make a spider web craft to take home. Designed for kids 3-5 years old with an adult. Included in general admission. 10-11 am.
Sept. 7 & 9: Art of the State activities—on Sept. 7, visit the Art of the State exhibit during a Learn at Lunchtime event; museum docents will provide tours of the exhibit starting at 12:15 pm. Included in general admission. On Sept. 9 (the last day of the Art of the State exhibit), the museum will participate in Harrisburg's Gallery Walk, which means general admission is free; an Artist Conversation program will be offered at 2 pm.
Sept. 13: Nature Lab program—learn about Pennsylvania Wild Canines, such as coyotes, red and gray foxes, and timber wolves. Designed for visitors age 7 and up. Included in general admission. 11:30 am.

Washington Crossing Historic Park
Please visit Washington Crossing's Calendar of Events page for info on park and historical programming.

The End of Summer?

Please see last week's post for events and programs coming up between now and the end of the month. I've highlighted some of this weekend's events below.


Eckley Back to School Program for Aug 25 2018
See program listings below for more info
As I was paring the list of events to include below, I was struck that several of them included the end of special hours or tours that were in place for the summer. I guess I haven't been paying attention, but in lots of ways, the end of August signals the transition to fall. Even when you don't have kids in school, there is a distinct change felt around this time of year (and not just because the school buses return to interfere with my morning commute, dadgummit). But anyway, here are some items that I think may be of interest.

Museums for All logo
During the course of the spring and summer, the majority of sites on the PHMC's PA Trails of History signed up to be part of the "Museums for All" program, an initiative of the Association of Children's Museums and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Participating museums nationwide offer discounted general admission to people who present an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card along with ID. PHMC (see list of participating sites) set "Museums for All" admission at $2 per person. In the period from April through June, 126 people received discounted admission at 11 sites.

An article in the Scranton Times-Tribune included mention of Sarah Sporko, who is entering her senior year at Misericordia University. As a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program participant, Sarah spent the summer at the Anthracite Heritage Museum working with staff to prepare for an upcoming photography exhibit. She was supervised by Jennifer Black, Ph.D., assistant professor of history at Misericordia, and Bode Morin, Ph.D., site administrator at Anthracite Heritage. The photography exhibit is set to open in November (we'll keep you posted).

I mentioned in a previous post (I think) that 2018 is the 300th anniversary of Pennsylvania founder William Penn's death. To commemorate the event, Pennsbury Manor has been focusing on Penn's legacy with various programs, including an upcoming panel discussion and luncheon with Pennsylvania's current governor and several past governors. But Penn and Pennsbury have inspired others, as well. A recent Facebook post alerted me to The William Penn Story, a new musical production by Philadelphia's Brotherly Love Theatre Company (BLTC). BLTC describes the production as "an amalgamation of jazz, funk, hip-hop, rock, and 17th-century Quaker ideology...inspired by productions like 1776, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, and Hamilton: An American Musical...." The musical will be staged at Lemon Hill Mansion in Fairmount Park on Sept. 9, 13, 16, and 19 as part of the 2018 Philadelphia Fringe Festival.

Beer brewing set up at Pennsbury Manor
The Brew House at Pennsbury Manor (via Facebook)

This weekend...

Bushy Run Battlefield
Aug. 25: Bushy Run Market—it's the 4th Saturday of the month, so that means a variety of vendors will be on site for your shopping enjoyment (more info on the website). Free for visitors and vendors. 8 am-noon.

Daniel Boone Homestead
Aug. 25: Lecture/demonstration—Revolutionary War interpreter Paul Trainor will present "18th-Century Medical Practices," which includes a display of period medical instruments. Included in regular admission. 2-4 pm.

Drake Well Museum
Aug. 25: Drake Day Circus—experience a traveling circus as it might have been during the height of the Pennsylvania oil boom (more info on Facebook event page). Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.
Aug. 26: Historic Pithole Open—the visitor center will be open for the final time this season, so enjoy the orientation film and the excellent diorama that shows the town in its heyday. PLEASE NOTE that Pithole will be closed on Aug. 25 so that staff/volunteers can be at the Drake Day Circus. Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.

Eckley Miners’ Village
Aug. 25: Back to School at Eckley—explore the village, visit the buildings, and take part in hands-on activities and a scavenger hunt as you go. Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.

Hope Lodge
Aug. 26: Site open—enjoy the grounds and take a guided tour of the mansion. Admission charged. 12:30-4 pm (tours at 1:00 and 2:30 pm).

Pennsbury Manor
Aug. 26: Special programming—this week, Beer Brewing and Garden Highlights. Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.

Pennsylvania Military Museum
Aug. 25-26: Saturday and Sunday, the 1 pm guided tour is included in museum admission.

Somerset Historical Center
Aug. 25: History on a Hayride—hear local tales and explore the historical center grounds from your seat in a hay wagon. Two rides each day. Cost is $10 per person, $8 for members. 10 am-2 pm.

State Museum of Pennsylvania
Aug. 24: Summer Friday (last of the season)—general admission is "pay as you wish" today, 9 am to 5 pm. Curiosity Connection will have free timed tickets available. Art docents will be on hand in the "Art of the State" exhibit from 11 am to 1 pm. Regular fees apply for planetarium shows. From 12:15 to 12:45 pm, curator Janet Johnson will present a program on the archaeological excavations at Fort Hunter.

On the Trails of History, August 17-31

Performer at 2014 Drake Day Circus plays with fire
Andrew of Top Hat Sideshow plays with fire as part of the 2014 Drake Day Circus (via Facebook); the 2018 event is Aug. 25 (see info below)

Bushy Run Battlefield
Aug. 25: Bushy Run Market—it's the 4th Saturday of the month, so that means a variety of vendors will be on site for your shopping enjoyment (more info on the website). Free for visitors and vendors. 8 am-noon.

Conrad Weiser Homestead
Sneak preview/programming note—the Patriotic Concert event originally scheduled for July 1 and postponed due to the heat has been rescheduled for Sunday, Sept. 2, at 5 pm.

Cornwall Iron Furnace
Aug. 17: Blast!—this event features local breweries and wineries (more info on Facebook), music by jazz keyboardist Wayne Fox, and catering by Hess Barbecue (pulled pork sandwiches, marinated chicken, sides, and dessert). You must be at least 18 years old to attend and 21 to sample alcoholic beverages. Tickets at the door tonight are $45 ($30 for DDs and under 21). 6-9 pm.

Daniel Boone Homestead
Aug. 22, 29: Sawmill Operation Days—subject to staff availability, there will be demonstrations of the site’s water-powered sawmill at 11 am and 2 pm.
Aug. 25: Lecture/demonstration—Revolutionary War interpreter Paul Trainor will present "18th-Century Medical Practices," which includes a display of period medical instruments. Included in regular admission. 2-4 pm.

Drake Well Museum
Aug. 18-19, 25-26: Historic Pithole Open—the visitor center will be open, so enjoy the orientation film and the excellent diorama that shows the town in its heyday. PLEASE NOTE that Pithole will be closed on Aug. 25 so that staff and volunteers can be at the Drake Day Circus. Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.
Aug. 25: Drake Day Circus—experience a traveling circus as it might have been during the height of the Pennsylvania oil boom (more info on Facebook event page). Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.

Eckley Miners’ Village
Aug. 25: Back to School at Eckley—explore the village, visit the buildings, and take part in hands-on activities and a scavenger hunt as you go. Admission charged. 10 am-4 pm.

Fort Pitt Museum
Please visit the Fort Pitt Museum website for information on this month's programs and events.

Graeme Park
Aug. 20: Living History Sunday—learn about the impact of the American Revolution on the folks living at Graeme Park and environs from some of General Anthony Wayne's soldiers. Admission charged. Noon-3 pm.
Aug. 30: Happy Hour with the Historian—Roddy Davis will present "The Philadelphia White House," featuring the Deshler-Morris House in Germantown, which George Washington used as a retreat from the city (when it was the U.S. capital) during the 1793 yellow fever epidemic. Admission is $5, free for members. Food and drink available for purchase starting at 6 pm; lecture starts at 7.

Hope Lodge
Aug. 19, 26: Site open—enjoy the grounds and take a guided tour of the mansion. Admission charged. 12:30-4 pm (tours at 1:00 and 2:30 pm).
Aug. 22: Movie Night—bring a blanket or lawn chair and settle in to watch Darkest Hour (2017), starring Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill. Presented by Whitemarsh Township Parks and Recreation. Admission is free, snacks available for purchase. Starts at dusk. (Raindate is TBD.)

Old Economy Village
Aug. 18: Basket Weaving—stay tuned to the website for updates on this workshop.
Aug. 19: Concert in the Garden—enjoy a summer evening concert by the River City Brass (bring lawn chairs, blankets, and a picnic supper). Event is scheduled to take place outdoors; in the event of bad weather it will move into the Feast Hall, so tickets are limited (check the Facebook event page or the OEV website for info on purchasing tickets). Gates open at 4 pm, concert starts at 5.

Pennsbury Manor
Aug. 19, 26: Special programming—8/19, Open Hearth Cooking; 8/26, Beer Brewing and Garden Highlights. Included in regular admission. 1-4 pm.

Pennsylvania Lumber Museum
Aug. 18: Build and Sail a Log Raft—a mini log raft, that is. Learn how early loggers built rafts to get logs to market, then try your hand at building and sailing a miniature version. Bring water shoes, because you'll be going into the creek (more info on Facebook event page). 1 pm.

Pennsylvania Military Museum
Aug. 18-19, 25-26: On weekends in August, the 1 pm guided tour is included in museum admission.

Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania
Aug. 18-19: Model Railroading Days—model train layouts from numerous railroading clubs will join the museum's layouts for a weekend of family fun and learning. Included in regular admission. 9 am-5 pm.

Somerset Historical Center
Aug. 18: Escape Room—two 60-minute games offered each day for up to 10 players. Solve the clues to escape from the barn. Cost is $10 per person. 10 am-2 pm.
Aug. 18: Lecture Series—Bill Rump of the Laurel Highlands Bottle Club will present "Bottle Documentation and Identification." Bring along your Somerset County (or other) glass bottles to help the center document local examples. 2 pm.
Aug. 25: History on a Hayride—hear local tales and explore the historical center grounds from your seat in a hay wagon. Two rides each day. Cost is $10 per person, $8 for members. 10 am-2 pm.

State Museum of Pennsylvania
Please visit the Planetarium webpage for a full schedule of shows.
Aug. 22-23: Curiosity Kids programs—museum staff will lead younger visitors on an exploration of the museum (program details are on the events calendar). Included in regular admission. 11:30 am.
Aug. 17, 24: Summer Fridays—general admission is "pay as you wish" on Fridays, 9 am to 5 pm. Curiosity Connection will have free timed tickets available. Art docents will be on hand in the "Art of the State" exhibit from 11 am to 1 pm. Regular fees apply for planetarium shows. From 12:15 to 12:45 pm, a variety of Learn at Lunchtime programs will be offered (check website for specifics).
Aug. 17: 3rd in the Burg—the "Great Summer Switch" is on the program. Susquehanna Art Museum director of education Tina Sell will lead a tour of the State Museum's "Art of the State" exhibit at 6 pm. Visitors can then walk up the street to the Susquehanna Art Museum where PHMC Commissioner and artist Ophelia Chambliss will lead a group through their exhibit, "Romare Bearden: Vision and Activism," at 7:15. Admission is free. The State Museum will be open 5:30-7:30 pm.

Washington Crossing Historic Park
Please visit the Washington Crossing website for information on programs and events.

500th Post!!

This is officially the 500th Trailheads post since we started back in August of 2009. On behalf of all who've posted, thanks for reading!

Last week's post included Trails of History events running through next Thursday (there have been a couple of updates) or you can check the August program page if you're planning further ahead.


Heading Home by Daven Anderson shows a large tanker and a smaller fishing boat
"Heading Home" by Daven Anderson is one of the featured works in a new exhibit at Erie Maritime Museum (used with permission)
Linda Bolla of the Erie Maritime Museum and U.S. Brig Niagara (a frequent Trailheads contributor and guest blogger these past 9 years) sent an update on the two-gallery exhibition opening at Erie Maritime this weekend. The overall title for the project is A Celebration of Life and Work on Our Waterways. The museum's West Wing Gallery will feature "THE RIVERS: A Celebration of Life and Work on America’s Waterways," a series of watercolors by Daven Anderson, Managing Director of the American Society of Marine Artists and Executive Director of the Missouri Watercolor Society. Anderson is a U.S. Coast Guard Artist and a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. As a complement to Anderson's work, the museum's Orientation Theater will display works by members of Erie's BLOOM Collaborative, which is dedicated to promoting better health through the arts. Anderson will present a gallery talk on Saturday, Aug. 11, at 2 pm, and there will be an opening reception from 1 to 2:30 pm on Sunday, Aug. 12 (more info). The exhibits continue through Oct. 27.

Artist working on large painting of dolphin
Phil, a member of the BLOOM Collaborative, works on a large-format painting of a dolphin

From Graeme Park's Facebook page: Last Friday Grover Silcox and his crew showed up to film an episode of "Let's Go!"--a show that highlights family-friendly things to do and places to go in the Lehigh Valley and beyond. Friends of Graeme Park Vice President Jack Washington volunteered to be the on-camera spokesperson (see photo below) and show them around, while a whole crew of costumed reenactors including John and Carol Brunner, Steve Griffith, Mary Washington, Julie Thibeau, Germain Ledoux, Bill Sparke, Jim Miller, Michael Carver, and Ellen Idelson, were on-hand to add to the Colonial atmosphere and show some local children how to play colonial games. The episode premiered last night but if you're in the WLVT viewing area, you can catch it again tomorrow (8/11) at 5:30 pm or on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at 7.

Camera crew filming outside visitor center at Graeme Park
Jack Washington, center, talks to camera crew for an episode of "Let's Go!" (via Graeme Park Facebook page)

Bushy Run Battlefield hosted its annual reenactment this past weekend. TribLive covered the event, and you can read all about it in their article. You can also see photos and video on Bushy Run's Facebook page. This weekend, the site is bringing back its popular tabletop gaming event (read more about that on the event page).

The Boys and Girls Club of Somerset recently visited Somerset Historical Center to see their lime kiln (built on site over the past few years) and learn about how the different uses of lime (no, not the kind in margaritas, the kind that comes from limestone). They shared some great photos on their Facebook page.

And finally, if you're planning to see The Meg this weekend (or ever), you might want to check out this article from PennLive. They talked to State Museum of PA paleontology and geology curator Dr. Steven Jasinski about megalodons to help separate fact from movie fiction (lots of good photos in this one).

Enjoy your weekend!